Sweeping The Yards

Sweeping the Yard

Sweeping the yard? What is that?
I dare say that there are few people under about 50 years old that have any idea about sweeping the yard. They have no point of reference, have never seen it done and certainly have never done it themselves. But it was a normal part of life in Sandy Point and the rural South in years past.
In my neighborhood, and probably yours, people spend a lot of time and money on their yards. Grass of various varieties are used to insure there is a well-groomed and plush green yard and just about every day there is a truck loaded with lawnmowers, weed eaters and edgers and blowers with their loud noises that can awaken the dead making sure that everything is perfect. Sprinkler systems spraying water across the yard to quench the thirst of the grass and flowers are using one of our most precious resources to just make grass grow so that we can cut, mow, trim and brag on a regular basis. Of course, some grass prevents erosion and serves a greater need.
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See

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I See

 

I see is something we say all the time. “Oh, yes, I see.”

We grow up learning little expressions and sayings that are perfectly natural to us and probably to those around us. There was a time when so called bad words were not used in the presence of small children because they tend to repeat the bad ones just like they do cat and dog and mommy and daddy. Often that occurs at the most possibly embarrassing moment. I don’t know if that rule is still in effect.

As a result, we sometimes do not think about the unlikely nature of the phrase we are using. Phrases like “I see”. That phrase has nothing to do with eyesight and may very well be used by a person who cannot literally see anything but has come to mean understanding or comprehension of whatever is being said or demonstrated, etc. A person may hear a speech or lecture or an explanation about string theory and simply reply, “I see.” Though, technically, they do not see but more precisely understand.
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Air Conditioning

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Air Conditioning

Hot in Sandy Point

According to Wikipedia:

In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine.[9] His hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died; Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the “Ice King”, Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the idea of air conditioning went away for 50 years.

 

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Bugged!

Bugged!

I walked out on the front stoop a few days back and looked up in the corner underneath the trim boards and saw what I thought was a new bird nest being built. I had problems there several times over the years and the birds really made a mess on the front so I have tried to prevent any more nests being constructed there. I went to get my step ladder to get up and see what was going on.

I had placed a large water bottle there to take up the space and that had worked for the past few years. When I moved it to see what was happening, I was face to face with a large wasp nest under construction. And, several angry wasps.
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