Sawmills and Slabs

Sawmills and Slabs

One of my neighbors stopped in the street yesterday and we were discussing the abrupt change in the weather as the first cold snap of the winter was moving in. We started talking about fireplaces and wood and then we started talking about wood stoves. This particular neighbor is one of the few in the neighborhood that is actually older than me and has actually been around wood stoves: not those newfangled ones but the old Home Comfort ones that Grandmother used to cook those delicious biscuits and apple pies. And, there were sawmills and slabs involved. People today might recognize a sawmill if they saw one but if you type in wood slab in Google you won’t see what we got as slabs back in Sandy Point.
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First and Last

 

 

The Last Time

 Those corny sayings that we heard as a child sometimes had little meaning or relevance at the moment we heard them. I remember hearing them from my grandparents from time to time and smile at the wisdom they were trying to impart in a simple saying or quote. They would probably be surprised that I remember the quote or that I even remember them or the lasting impact they had on my life. My mother’s mother had a little saying that she would utter from time to time and I have never heard it the way she said it any where else: “Nothing beats a can’t like a try.”
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The Old Trunk


 

 

The Old Trunk
My grandfather had an old trunk down in Sandy Point that used to set in the corner of the front bedroom. There was a lock on the trunk and the key hung in the small closet in his bedroom. The trunk had two straps that helped secure the lid and they were buckled somewhat like an old leather belt. This is not an actual picture but is similar.
trunk-insert

Kids knew this was strictly off limits and all the things that bound the family and insured its security were kept in the trunk. The Old Family Bible, the genealogical family record, was in there too. It never was carried to church: it came out when someone was born or someone died. The event was recorded there.
You might find letters, a .32 Cal. pistol and some shells and bits and pieces of things that made up their lives. There was an old pocket watch that did not run any longer but had belonged to a deceased relative. Any financial records would be in that trunk, as well. A tin type picture from long ago.
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Conscience

Conscience

Is it Conscience or is it Conscious? Most people walking around are conscious but not all of those walking around have a conscience.

A fellow I know used to say, “An ounce of conscience and a dose of morality will cost you a lot of money in a lifetime.”
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Campmeeting Time

Camp Meeting Time

Summer time in the South, and Sandy Point, is and was, Camp Meeting Time.

 There was a time when “church” played a major role in the lives of the people in the South and, I suppose, the country. Much of the social activity of family life was centered in the goings on at the church, as it was often referred to.

We will be at the church Sunday. In the old days, Church could be an all day affair. Some churches met once a month on the First, Second, Third, or Fourth Sunday. If there happened to be five Sundays in the month, well, you caught a break and did not have to show up. The most dedicated Church People would go to another church on the fifth Sunday. Homecoming Sunday was once a year with Dinner on the Grounds to get a chance to meet old friends and family that had moved away from the area or to another church.
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The Drift Boat Detective

SubSURFACE

A New Drift Boat Detective Novel

Coming in 2017!!

A new challenge for Russell Baker, The Drift Boat Detective, as he takes clues in bits and pieces and hunts for the people who shot the Madison County Sheriff.

The Drift Boat Detective
A Novel By Jerome Chapman

Murder On The Madison
The Drift oat Detective

The first book in The Drift Boat Detective series is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com., Tate Publishing; Books A Million, Target and Family Christian and your local independent book sellers.

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FIND THE BOOK AT:

The Book Exchange, Canton Rd. Marietta

The Book Shelf, Broad St., Thomasville, Ga.

Initial reviews have been good from both male and female readers.

Russell Baker is a happy man with a good job as a Detective on the Cobb County Police Department. But when his wife dies, he loses his way and moves to Bozeman, Montana, the place he met his wife Sarah. He sets out to find himself again.

After discovering a murder victim on the Madison River, he is dragged back into police work. He finds murderers, crooked cops, drug dealers, and the beautiful Nancy and the lovely Miriam. And, he finds himself.

You will find love, murder, and redemption.
Please check us out at:
WWW.Driftboatdetective.com. And, like us on Facebook!

Choppin Cotton

Blog Insert Cotton

Choppin Cotton

Names and terms can be deceptive and especially when they have long since stopped being used in everyday language. Choppin Cotton is just such a phrase.

I don’t know today how many people have ever seen a cotton field growing and could identify one if they drove past it. It’s not very hard once the cotton bolls have opened and the field turns into one giant, we can’t say ball but maybe, sheet of cotton. But in the early plant stages when people drive through around Cordele and Unadilla and Pinehurst and Pelham and Parrott, they might have trouble distinguishing what is cotton and what is soy beans from the busy interstate. There was a time when cotton was king everywhere, but today you’ll find a variety of crops and irrigation and pesticides and herbicides along with modern machinery have changed the complexion of farming from when I followed my Grandfather around in the fields of the family farm down in Sandy Point.
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Good Man!?

Good Man!?
Good man! Sometimes you hear that at a ball game when a player does something very good at a very critical time. Sometimes when someone finds your wallet under the trash can that you thought was lost. “Good man!” you might say. A salesman closes the big deal and saves the month’s business. Your son gets a scholarship or simply passes 8th grade. Good Man!

Then, there is the use of that phrase to describe the kind of person someone was or is. An attempt to make known the quality of person that phase is being directed to. A phrase used to explain the nature of someone when there are no words that seem to suit.
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Sweeping The Yards

Sweeping the Yard

Sweeping the yard? What is that?
I dare say that there are few people under about 50 years old that have any idea about sweeping the yard. They have no point of reference, have never seen it done and certainly have never done it themselves. But it was a normal part of life in Sandy Point and the rural South in years past.
In my neighborhood, and probably yours, people spend a lot of time and money on their yards. Grass of various varieties are used to insure there is a well-groomed and plush green yard and just about every day there is a truck loaded with lawnmowers, weed eaters and edgers and blowers with their loud noises that can awaken the dead making sure that everything is perfect. Sprinkler systems spraying water across the yard to quench the thirst of the grass and flowers are using one of our most precious resources to just make grass grow so that we can cut, mow, trim and brag on a regular basis. Of course, some grass prevents erosion and serves a greater need.
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See

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I See

 

I see is something we say all the time. “Oh, yes, I see.”

We grow up learning little expressions and sayings that are perfectly natural to us and probably to those around us. There was a time when so called bad words were not used in the presence of small children because they tend to repeat the bad ones just like they do cat and dog and mommy and daddy. Often that occurs at the most possibly embarrassing moment. I don’t know if that rule is still in effect.

As a result, we sometimes do not think about the unlikely nature of the phrase we are using. Phrases like “I see”. That phrase has nothing to do with eyesight and may very well be used by a person who cannot literally see anything but has come to mean understanding or comprehension of whatever is being said or demonstrated, etc. A person may hear a speech or lecture or an explanation about string theory and simply reply, “I see.” Though, technically, they do not see but more precisely understand.
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A place in the State of Mind